How to allow SVG uploads in WordPress

Don’t.

Nope, stop.

You developers/bloggers who keep passing the below code around as a valid way of allowing SVG uploads in WordPress are killing me inside.

function cc_mime_types($mimes) {
    $mimes['svg'] = 'image/svg+xml';
    return $mimes;
}
add_filter('upload_mimes', 'cc_mime_types');

Yes, this will allow you to upload SVGs in WordPress, it will also allow someone to upload an XML Bomb or an SVG with an XXE attack or god forbid a lovely XSS attack. You see, too many developers are allowing SVG uploads without thinking about what that means. Seriously, why do you think WordPress hasn’t added SVG uploads into core yet? Not because they want to make life difficult but because they understand the security risks that are imposed by allowing an SVG to be uploaded.

There is currently, as far as I’m aware, no well tested PHP library for SVG sanitisation. There have been a few attempts but as far as I can tell, they’ve all been far too lenient on allowing potentially dangerous attributes through. To me, this means they either are too trusting, or don’t fully understand the potential payloads that can be embedded within an SVG.

The library I’ve been working on has taken the opposite stance. By default, be overly aggressive when stripping attributes and elements and then allow people to add their own whitelist if they need to. This, I think is the only feasible way of properly sanitising an SVG.

As for WordPress and SVGs, please stop using the above code. It makes me cringe every time I see it, especially when I think that this is actually in use on production sites. Fine, play with SVGs locally but to put this on a public facing server? Well, you’re a braver person than me.

Please people, use SVGs in your front end builds, use it as backgrounds, images, inline, whatever, but please stop allowing people to upload un-sanitised SVGs to the system. There’s no difference between allowing an SVG upload to allowing a PHP upload. For those of you that think that allowing a PHP upload is OK, because there’s obviously a fair few of you please stop developing. Seriously.

/rant

Sanitize SVGs in WordPress

So my plugin Safe SVG has just been accepted into the WordPress plugin directory. Whilst mainly a proof of concept, I’m hoping that this plugin will help convince the core team that SVGs, with the right sanitization should become part of core.

My major argument for allowing SVGs in core with sanitization is that there are currently 128 other SVG upload plugins in the plugin directory (source), plus the likes of the posts on blogs like CSS Tricks such as this one that all show you how to allow SVG uploads in WordPress, but don’t address or sometimes even mention the massive security risks that come with allowing users to upload SVGs.

SVGs should be considered as standalone XML applications, there are a huge number of vulnerabilities that can be attacked. For example, some of the easiest to implement are XXE attacks and the Billion Laughs attack. Safe SVG nullifies these attacks by removing the DOCTYPE from the SVG file, something so simple yet overlooked by most other plugins.

Safe SVG also protects against XSS attacks embedded within the XML file by defining a strict whitelist of elements and attributes allowed within the SVG, anything not on these whitelists are removed. Whilst this may break some Javascript powered SVG animations, I feel that is a small price to pay for peace of mind when it comes to your users security.

Probably the best way to learn more about Safe SVG is to go and download it from the WordPress plugin directory and take a look through the code, alternatively you can see the library it’s built upon on Github. If you find a bypass or have any suggestions on how to improve this plugin or the underlying library, please don’t hesitate to contact me and let me know your thoughts.